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John Coltrane June 28, 1965

Main Session Personnel
tenor saxophone
tenor saxophone
tenor saxophone
trumpet
trumpet
alto saxophone
alto saxophone
piano
bass
bass
drums
# Tracks Playtime Issue Variance from Main Session Personnel
1 Ascension (Ed. II, Part 1) 18:53
2 Ascension (Ed. II, Part 2) 21:30
Ascension
Catalog #: A(S) 95
3 Ascension (Ed. I, Part 1) 18:55
Ascension
Catalog #: A(S) 95
4 Ascension (Ed. I, Part 2) 19:42
Content State: draft
genre: free
Recording Date: 
1965-06-28
Label Name: 
Impulse
Leader(s): 
John Coltrane
Skill/instrument: 
tenor saxophone
Skill/instrument: 
tenor saxophone
Skill/instrument: 
tenor saxophone
Skill/instrument: 
trumpet
Skill/instrument: 
trumpet
Skill/instrument: 
alto saxophone
Skill/instrument: 
alto saxophone
Skill/instrument: 
piano
Skill/instrument: 
bass
Skill/instrument: 
bass
Skill/instrument: 
drums
Personnel: 
John Coltrane
Personnel: 
Pharoah Sanders
Personnel: 
Archie Shepp
Personnel: 
Freddie Hubbard
Personnel: 
Dewey Johnson
Personnel: 
John Tchicai
Personnel: 
Marion Brown
Personnel: 
McCoy Tyner
Personnel: 
Jimmy Garrison
Personnel: 
Art Davis
Personnel: 
Elvin Jones
Ensemble Size: 
big_band
Venue Type: 
studio
Venue Name: 
Van Gelder Studios
Venue Location: 
Englewood Cliffs, NJ
Session Details: 

According to the Reference Book, there's been a lot of confusion regarding the tracks: namely, which was actually the first take, versus what was labeled as such; and whether both takes are one continuous performance or not. Suffice to say there is some controversy, and for further reading please see the original source. Basically, though, Ascension is really one continuous composition in a free-form. There are two 'editions', or "Ed. 1" and "Ed. 2", but because of their free nature, it would be incorrect to say one is the 'alternate take' per se, unless we just want to say that the one released afterwards is necessarily the 'alternate take'. However, it's not the alternate in the sense of a normal composition would be. Likewise, Part 1 and Part 2 are part of the same take, but because they encompass two sides of an LP when released, they got chopped up, it seems. 

Sources: 
John Coltrane Reference Book